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Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Discussion: ARCs - What they are, how to get them, and what to do with them.


ARCs: What they are, how to get them, what to do with them.

What are ARCs?
An ARC is an Advanced Reader Copy, also called an uncorrected Galley, and it is used as a marketing tool to help spread publicity for that specific title. ARCs are given to booksellers, librarians, reviewers, and as of late, bloggers. ARCs are not free books. They cost money to make, and money to send. ARCs are to be used for publicity purposes, including reviews. ARCs are not to be sold. They aren't finished books. They still have mistakes in them. They are used to spark buzz about a book in order to get people excited for that title.

Who gets ARCs?
Booksellers use ARCs to determine whether or not they will stock their shelves with that book when the time comes to start ordering. Librarians use ARCs to determine the same thing. However, not every bookseller or librarian gets an ARC of every title. At my local library, the ARCs go to the main offices where librarians then decide what titles every library in their district will receive. That means that although there are about 15 libraries in the district, the ARCs are only going to one place. The same goes for bookstores.

For example, I work at Barnes and Noble. Now, I know Barnes and Noble is a huge corporation so obviously there is no way that every store would get an ARC of every book. That's a ridiculous thought. However, we do get ARCs on occasion. The ARCs are given to us by the publisher in order to get booksellers reading titles early so we are better prepared to sell the book when the time comes. I have a friend who works for a chain of indie bookstores in my area. She's the head of children's marketing for the entire chain and receives TONS of ARCs every week. She picks out the ones she really wants to read and gladly passes along the rest to booksellers and bloggers.

And of course, we get ARCs. Bloggers receive ARCs as less of a sales tool and more of a publicity tool. We get ARCs so we can write reviews and spread the news of a great (or not so great) book. We help build excitement for that title. We may not place books directly in a buyer's hands, but we help plant the seed. We spread the word about great titles and share out enthusiasm about amazing books that we love and want to hug, and place on our pillow at night. Don't pretend you haven't done this. And we do it for free. We don't get paid to read stacks of books and then spend hours writing reviews, formatting posts, etc. We do it for free, because we love to read.

How do I get my hands on that coveted ARC?
I didn't receive my first ARC until I was well into blogging. I didn't even know you could ask for them. I didn't know what they were, how people got them, or what they were for. When I started blogging, I was just writing about amazing books that I had bought, borrowed, etc. (Of course I was also writing about horrible books too...) I started blogging because I love to read and I love to recommend great titles, not because I wanted free books. And that is the first step.

In order to get your hands on ARCs, you have to be committed. Post consistently for at least 6 months. Spend time commenting on other blogs to build your network. Hang out on Twitter and make yourself known. Build a following. Be yourself. Most publishers request that you blog for at least 6 months and have a minimum of 350 followers. Some ask that you blog for at least a year. It all depends on the publisher. I waited until I was about 6 months into blogging before I started requesting anything, and I didn't get my first ARC until I had been blogging for 10 months. That is a long time to commit to.

Once you've established yourself a bit, send out some emails. I started by simply requesting multiple titles in an email to a publisher. Things to include in your emails:
  • Your blog name and a link
  • Your stats (followers, length of time blogging, unique visitors, email subscribers, Twitter followers, etc.)
  • The title of the book, author, and ISBN number
  • Why you want to review said books
  • Gratitude and professionalism (You would think this would be a no-brainer, but you'd be surprised.) I always start my emails with, “Hello and thank you for your time” and end them with, “Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you”
  • Keep it short. Publishers receive massive amounts of emails a day. The shorter your email the better. Keep it quick and to the point.
Other ways to get ARCs:
  • Friends. I give out my ARCs to my blogger friends all the time. I have so many that I don't have space for them. And most of them have come from my friends. Friends like to share with friends. Of course, don't make it a habit of attempting to befriend people simply for their ARCs. We're not stupid, and we know when people are using us. Also, most of my ARCs are given to me by friends who just have too many.
  • Conventions. I know you've seen all those posts about ALA, BEA, and other cons where people come home with tons of ARCs. If you can swing it, you should definitely go. Go to ALA, BEA, Comic-Con, and any other con you can find. Not just because you want a ton of books, but because it's a great chance to network. As always, don't be greedy, that's how we get a bad reputation. I went to Comic-Con and managed to come home with two new publishing contacts, tons of new followers, and several new friends. Conventions are a great place for bookish people like us to get together and be ourselves.
  • Giveaways. If I can't pawn my ARCs off on my friends I host giveaways. Tons of bloggers hold giveaways for their old ARCs. Find them and enter!
I'm sure there are plenty of other ways to get them, I just can't think of them right now.

What do I do with them when I'm done?
  1. Shelve them. I know a lot of people like to keep ARCs simply because they enjoy having ARCs on their shelves. If you want to keep them, go ahead!
  2. Give them to friends. ARCs are in high demand with bloggers and there are a lot of us who can't get our hands on them. I love to pass on my ARCs to other bloggers because it means that not only will they get the chance to read and review it, but that's one more review out there for that book that the publisher doesn't have to send out and ARC for.
  3. Host a giveaway. Say your friends don't want it. Or maybe you just feel like being generous. Have a giveaway! There are going to be tons of people who would love to have that book on their shelf, even if it is an ARC! If you're going to host a giveaway, ask the publisher first. I've never had an experience where the publisher cared, but it's always polite to ask!
What do you do with your ARCs when you're done with them? I know a lot of people donate theirs to the library, but my library sells donated books in their monthly book sale and I can't stand when ARCs pop up in the inventory so I try not to contribute to that.

Also, do the author a favor and buy their book if you really loved it. Authors don't get paid for ARCs so if you never buy finished copies because you keep your ARCs, you're doing that author a disservice. If you can afford it, buy up finished copies of books you've read as ARCs so that you can help support an author you love and you'll help insure that they continue to publish amazing stories for you. 

Remember, ARCs aren't free and you don't deserve them.
I get a lot of questions about ARCs and how to get them and things like that. It seems like a lot of people are really into blogging simply because they want free books. But ARCs aren't free. ARCs cost about $15-$20 each. And publishers and authors make no money off of ARCs. So imagine how many ARCs publishers send out each year, an author friend of mine did the math and discovered that publisher can easily spend over $100,000 on ARCs alone. So don't get greedy. If you're only blogging to get free books than you're doing it for all the wrong reasons. Blogging takes a ridiculous amount of time and energy and if you're not passionate about books than you will never succeed at it. I blog because I love spreading the word about great literature and I want to encourage teens to read and love reading. I spend hours on the computer formatting posts, writing reviews, as well as hours reading books that are both fantastic and not-so-great. I do it all for free.

If you request an ARC, make that commitment to reviewing it. By receiving the book in the first place you're entering an unwritten agreement that you'll do your part and review the book whether you liked it or not. Same goes for ARCs you get from giveaways, conventions, friends, etc. ARCs are a marketing tool and if you don't plan on using them for that purpose then don't bother asking for them or taking them. I always consider ARCs to be review books because that is what they are made for. If you're just going to read them and shelve them like you would any book than buy a finished copy. Don't be greedy and just take it because it's “free” because it's not.

Don't act like you deserve to get every ARC out there. I don't deserve them and you don't deserve them. ARCs are a privilege that we receive through hard work and professionalism. When I get denied a title from the publisher I don't throw a fit and demand they send it to me. I graciously thank them for taking the time to even read my email or look at my blog and remember that they have sent me plenty of titles in the past and I thank them for their generosity. Publishers are not required to send us anything. They do it because bloggers can be a good marketing tool when we're passionate enough about the books we're reading and reviewing. We will never replace booksellers or librarians. These people actually put books in the hands of buyers. We may spark their interest and even convince someone to buy the book through our own words, but we do not replace the amazing people who physically put books in the hands of teenagers on a daily basis. Remember that. 

63 comments:

  1. Before I started blogging, I'd only heard of ARCs once because an author came to our school, and our book club got a few copies. I had no idea bloggers received ARCs, so I was bewildered by the idea.

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    1. Same here. The only way I had gotten any was from my local bookstore because they would give them away at events.

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  2. I give many ARCs to my sister, who is a librarian. She gives them away to her teens for the summer reading program and things events like that. If you don't want them to be sold, I would directly approach the teen librarian to see if they would like more giveaway books.

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    1. I actually did talk to the teen librarian at my library and they don't host any events so they never get ARCs, nor would they do anything with them. It was kind of disappointing, but I asked if they wanted someone to host events for them and I never heard back. Oh well, if she was interested I would totally have given them to her!

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    2. Awww. That's disappointing. :( My sister is always looking for giveaways for the kids at her library.

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    3. Yeah! I know a lot of libraries give them to teens and then have them write mini reviews which I think is AWESOME and I would love to put that into play at my own library and work with teens in that way, but apparently they aren't interested :(

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  3. Thanks for this really informative post! I had a lot of questions about ARCs but I don't get why people start blogs for ARCs I just want to make my blog better for my readers having reviews for books before they come out and to help spread the word!

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    1. That's why I like to have ARCs. At my bookstore we only hold on to new copies of books for a few months before we return them to the publisher (because we're such a small store we don't have the space for tons and tons of books). So if I can review something before it's even out it gives that book a month's head start for people to start pre-ordering it, and even noticing it once it hits shelves.

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  4. One thing that occured to me the other day was to donate them to the battered women shelter (I don't know if homeless shelters take things like this). It would definitely be something to look into

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    1. That would be a good idea. Or even the children's hospital!

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  5. Great discussion! Thank you for all the information. I get a few books to review but I have only received one ARC. I think I might request for one, you have given really god advice! :)

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  6. FANTASTIC TOPIC LADY!!!!! I really loved this and it gave me a lot to think about. ARCs are like crack to bloggers sometimes and we forget that it does cost to produce!!!

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    1. I totally agree. I think we get caught up in the novelty of them and some people begin to think that they deserve them because they blog, but none of us deserve them. They're a privilege and it's inappropriate to act like we should get all of them.

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  7. Great post Anna! I personally get all my ARCs from giveaways. And occasionally I will get approved on netgalley. Other than that, I have so many of my own books and also use the library in the summertime, especially. I do like to keep some ARCs, especially from my favorite series or if they are signed. And now I wait to buy the HC because I need covers to match and there seems to be a lot of cover changes lately, mid-series. When I am done though, I like to give them away on my blog or when school starts I was going to see if the local HS could use them at all in classrooms, I am not sure. I am still a newbie and I feel like I don't know anything about the book blogging world so thank you for sharing the post. :)

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    1. I, sadly, have no time to read my own books anymore, but all the ARCs I have are books I would have bought anyways, so I don't feel like I'm really missing out. I hardly request any anymore because I just have too many that have accumulated. When I do ask for them, I always make sure it's something I'd want to buy when it came out anyways.

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  8. Fantastic post, Anna girl. We ALL need to keep this in mind. I know it still rocks my socks off EVERY single time I get an ARC, or when a publicist responds to my email or says they liked my review. At the end of the day, ARCs are a privilege, NOT A RIGHT. I really like how you broke this one down and explained everything. I always consider an ARC a review book, too!

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    1. I think we have to, because that's what ARCs are for! They're MADE for publicity and sales purposes, not for us to take and shelve. If we don't use them for what they're made for then we're just being dishonest and greedy.

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  9. Another great discussion post Anna! I totally agree with what you say and you pointed out some really helpful advice for bloggers.

    I have been blogging for almost two years now and I have probably only requested only a few arcs. I just still feel like I don't deserve them even though I put a lot of time and work into my blog every single day. I didn't start my blog for free books. I started it because I loved reading and I wanted to have someplace to share that passion with others and get more people to read these books. I also know that it costs the publishers money to make and send arcs out.

    I am extrememly grateful for the ones that I do have and make sure I make the time to review them. I definitely share the arcs that I do have too because I want to help spread the word as much as possible. It is definitely important to not get greedy though. At BEA there are so many books there and I made a plan for myself early on that I would only ask for the arcs that I know I will read.

    Arcs are definitely a privilege though! Also it's not the end of the world if you don't get an arc because it's not like the book will never be published. You may just have to wait a few more months but that isn't going to stop me from reading the book.

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    1. I definitely agree, if you don't have the time to read them all then don't ask for them. ARCs are meant to be read and reviewed and passed on if you can. I like to share mine so that people don't have to worry about asking for them and I can just spread the wealth :)

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  10. Thanks for the well-written and important reminder that ARC's are a privilege. I love how you mentioned wanting to hug books, i actually hug my favorite paperback books often, hardbacks are too hard.
    Amazing post Anna!

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    1. Hahahaha I have to hug my books because they are fantastic and I love them!!!!

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  11. I love this post and appreciate the time you took to type it up. ARCs are a privilege, NOT a right. They are a perk, not a necessity. I never keeps my ARCs unless they happened to be signed by the author to me. I think I only have 2-3 of those, at most. Otherwise, I use ARCs as an opportunity to share the love with other readers and I ALWAYS purchase the finished copy of ARCs I enjoyed. I think the above post should be a resource for all new bloggers, like a Code of ARC Ethics.

    Thanks for putting this all out there!

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    1. I keep the ones that are signed as well, but if I can help it I don't get them personalized so I can host a giveaway, and then I buy the finished copy at the signing for myself.


      And thank you! I hope EVERYONE EVER reads this, but I know they won't :P Hopefully it'll at least help some people out!

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  12. Thank you. I've been wanting to know what an arc is but was to embarrassed to ask. That was really helpful. :) I love reading and I am just now starting to follow everyone. I wanted to start my own blog but just to put out what I like and how I feel about what I'm reading. I'm a little nervous about it though.

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  13. Great post! I have been doing this for 5 years and I still get nervous asking for an ARC. I saw a post from a new blogger the other day. She said she had asked for some ARC's and the publisher sent her 9. She only had 5 followers! That bugs me.

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    1. It can definitely be pretty aggravating to see newbie bloggers getting tons and tons of ARCs because I don't think they understand the commitments and costs of them, but it's ultimately the publisher's choice and if they think they're making a good one then we shouldn't argue. If you've been at it for 5 years I don't think there's anything to be nervous about! That's crazy commitment!

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  15. What a great post! This topic has been coming up a lot lately and it's sparked some really eye opening conversation. As an indie author, it means a lot to me that a blogger review the book if they accept it, particularly in the case of a bound copy. As you've pointed out, it's truly meant to be a marketing tool and there is an expense associated with the production. That said, when I send out a copy, I understand that things come up, TBR lists get long, and nothing in life is guaranteed. That's the chance you take sometimes. I LOVE being given the opportunity to share my work and am extremely appreciative of the bloggers who support indie authors!

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    1. I totally agree that we shouldn't accept books that we don't plan on reading, but my review policy does state that I don't guarantee reviews for books I request. It's not that I do this because I PLAN on not reviewing something, but if I start reading and I end up not being able to finish it I won't post a DNF review. If I disliked it, sure I'll review it, but that also poses the issue where authors get angry with reviewers for not liking their books. It's a fine line, and I think we all need to be more aware of who we're working with and what everyone's expectations are.

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  16. Fantastic post! When I started my blog I didn't know anything about ARCs either. I do it because I love reading and spreading the word. If I love a book I will buy it when it comes out. I want to support authors and publishers. The ARCs are wonderful for getting buzz up about a book, but in no way should ever replace buying the actual finished copy of a book. Thanks for the wonderful post Anna!!

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    1. I totally agree, ARCs don't take the place of an actual book! Especially since finished copies tend to have tons of great pictures, maps, things like that. They're so so much better!! I definitely still buy books, or just mark that I WANT to own the book :D

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    2. I know what you mean. Obviously I can't buy every single book that I want, but I will buy as many as I can and put the others on my wish list. ;)

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  17. Wow. This really was a great post you wrote. I think you are completely right with everything you said. Being a newbie blogger, I've been trying my best just trying to grow my network. It really is hard work and I can tell you right now that ARCs are definitely not on the top of my list when it comes to the appearance and appeal to my blog. I remember when I got my first ARC, and that was from another blogger friend of mine. This may sound a bit funny, but I was honored to be able to just hold it in my hands. And I didn't even keep the ARC.
    Honestly, I don't understand the greed to it all. I think you are totally right when you said that we all should work hard to get those ARCs and be gracious and grateful for when we communicate with the authors and publishing companies.
    I'm really glad you discussed this on your blog and I think that you gave really good advice. I hope that soon all of this drama will stop soon! :D

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    1. I totally know what you mean!!! Just holding an ARC can be a great experience, they're like magical unicorns!!! I think blogging should never be about "free" books and should be about spreading the love of great literature that we want everyone to read and own :)
      I really hope the drama will end, but I think the important thing is to just do your own thing and not let it affect you.

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  18. Awesome post Anna! I think a lot of people get kind of disillusioned about the whole thing and suddenly it becomes about being entitled to the books they are sent.
    I get super nervous when I send ARC requests, to be honest I send very few just because I feel it's a rather big deal.
    I'm happy to see someone talking about it so throughly.

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    1. I totally know what you mean about getting nervous! I am always like, "OMG what if they say no?! What if they laugh in my face? What if they HATE me?!?!" and then I just suck it up. So what if they say no, it's not like the book is never going to come out! I wish more people would understand that we aren't required to receive them.

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  19. I've been blogging since November 2011 and I am still getting the hang of it. There's so much to learn! Book blogging takes up a lot of my time but I love because of my passion for books. Also, the amount of books I have been reading has actually increased since I started blogging. So that's been a big plus for me.

    I received my fist ever ARC back in May and I am still so excited. I requested it a few months ago and when it arrived on my doorstep just like that, I was squealing for joy!

    Great discussion post, Anna!

    Sana @ artsy musings of a bibliophile

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    1. I know what you mean! The amount of books I've been reading has increased as well, which is fantastic :D I think blogging is definitely something you have to be really passionate about and commitment to because it takes a lot of hard work and a lot of time to really be good at it. Congrats on your ARC, that is awesome!

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    2. Yes, passion and commitment are must.

      Thank you! =D

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  20. I agree with everything you said!

    I especially like that you took the time to mention that it is okay if you want to keep your ARCs. I think a lot of the recent issues surrounding ARCs has made it seem like we are obligated to donate/giveaway/get rid of somehow every ARC we get and then buy the book.

    And, while I'm happy to spend every last extra penny I have on books, that still leaves a lot of books I can't afford and I have a steady job and such. A lot of teenagers run book blogs and people who don't have steady jobs. I hate that we, as a group, might be making them feel bad if they don't buy a book.

    I'm not saying you should request ARCs for the sole purpose of saving money, but I also don't think reading an ARC should mean you HAVE to buy the book as well.

    Anyways, awesome post. And I hope my comment makes sense.

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    1. As long as you don't sell them, I don't think there's really a WRONG decision as to what to do with them. I do, however, think that it's important to remember that authors and publishers make 0 money off of them, so if you really loved it and you can afford to buy it then support the author.

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  21. Great post. I've read many similar ones by other bloggers- ARCs seem like the big question right now with bloggers. I was clueless about ARCs when I started blogging- I was just posting about books I got from the library. xD Now I've been blogging for a year and a couple months, and I just started having authors come to me with their ARCs. I must admit, I've requested some I wanted, too. *cheeky grin* Sometime you get them, sometimes you don't. The important thing is not trying to get them by bugging publishers and authors, and also not thinking that you need them. ARCs are great, but in all honesty, they can be annoying sometimes, especially if you discover you don't like the book. Thanks again for the great discussion!
    ~Shelby @ Gobs and Gobs of Books

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    1. I think ARCs are a really hot topic in the blogging world right now, due to all the controversy that's been surround ALA and the like. As long as we remain polite and considerate about requesting them without acting like we are owed them, I'm sure all this drama will blow over. Hopefully everyone will realize that one bad apple doesn't mean we're all greedy jerks.

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  22. Anna! I have been so excited about this post since you mentioned it on Twitter! I think it is an amazing topic and you did a great job at discussing the WHOLE topic of ARCS... I didn't know what an ARC was until after 3 months of blogging and I won one off of Goodreads... I read it as fast as I could reviewed it and was SUPER excited about it! I've been blogging for 7 months now and have just requested my first ARC and received it. You are so right there is so much time and effort that goes into blogging and I love blogging because I love to read. I really have so many books to read without ARCs lol. I really appreciate the privilege that publishers give us bloggers and don't take it for granted at all. I have met so many amazing people, heard of and bought many fabulous books, and that is reward enough for me!

    I am still starstruck when holding an ARC in my hands lol. I have been very blessed with some friends who have sent me ARCs because I would have never asked haha... I think you are right you shouldn't become friends with someone for ARCS.

    Thanks so much for this awesome post! I hope you do more in the future!

    Kayla @ Bengal Reads

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    1. Yayy I'm glad you enjoyed it :D I think ARCs are always going to be a hot topic in the blogging world and there is always going to be a lot of drama surrounding them, but it's important to remember that we're all blogging (or should be) because we love books and if we're not willing to review our own books that we buy or borrow then we shouldn't be doing it in the first place.

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  23. Great discussion topic. I've recently started a blog with my best friend. I've only received one hard copy ARC that I won in a giveaway[which I loved and will definitely buy when it comes out], and a few that I've gotten from netgalley. Even without the few ARCs I've received I have TONS of books I haven't even read yet because I'm always buying books. I blog about books because reading and reviewing is something I enjoy. I don't think I'll have the nerve to request ARCs, even once I've been blogging for a while. Thanks for the great post!
    -Kait @ YA Vixens

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    1. I totally agree. And you can always send your reviews of books you own to publishers so they can check out your blog and what not. Even if I didn't get the book from them, I still send them links just so they know I'm talking about their books!

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  24. Thanks for the post Anna. I have been following blogs for about a year and just started reviewing in February. I had no clue what an ARC was until I won a contest for an ARC and when I received it it said Advanced Reader Copy on it. I didn't find out about not selling them until a few months later which I didn't anyway but still helps with the info. I am very happy that you posted this it gave me alot of info. I hope to start my own blog at some time and I was curious how bloggers got ARC's. Right now I have to many books to review to even consider requesting any but it is good info to know. Again thanks for this post and if you got any more informational posts please post that sometime too. Also I like the invites that you do on GR because I was following all my blogs by email but my email just can't take anymore so I follow on GR also now.

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    1. You can always follow through a Google Reader! If you already have a Google acct then it's super easy to use :) Just go to reader.google.com and whenever you see the little feed icon on a blog click it and it'll tell you how to add that blog to your reader. But I know what you mean about having too many books to even consider requesting them. My piles are overflowing and I have no room for more books so I haven't even been requesting lately. Good luck with starting your blog!

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  25. I loved the post and do most of what you suggested with mine from giving them away to the hospital/libraries to trading them with other bloggers. I've found that trading goes a long way because we both end up with books we've been dying to read (there's a goodreads group about this) and we each blog about the book more often than not. I tend to buy hardcovers of the arcs I really loved or buy them for birthdays for others.

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    1. I like trading as well, because then we all get books we want and it cuts down on the amount of ARCs that publishers send out :) I love that you buy copies of books you enjoy, I think that's a great way to still offer support, and then at least you're not buying books without knowing if you'll like them or not!!

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  26. This was such a great post! And you know I'm going to be honest here, but I've read a few of these posts where the bloggers are talking about "Don't blog for the ARCs", and just by some of their previous posts I have a hard time taking them seriously, but I honestly didn't get that with this post!

    I came into the blogging world almost two years ago, and honestly had no idea ARCs existed! I will admit, when I heard about them I was absolutely fascinated with them, and while I would still love to get them from people, I know it isn't necessary because first off all I LOVE books! I have a ton on my shelves and my kindle that I haven't had the chance to read. And second like you said, I blog because I love to do it! It's the one place I can talk about what I love doing! Reading! :)
    Thanks for sharing! I truly enjoyed it!

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  27. Wow! Thanks for sharing! I'm new to blogging and book reviews, and I never really understood what an ARC was. A lot of good stuff to keep up mind. Thanks again!

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  28. Great post! I had been reviewing for about 4 months before I learned about ARCS, and the only physical ARCs I've had have come from giveaways, or authors sending them to me to review. Up until then all the books I reviewed were either ones I purchased or from the library.

    NetGalley is a great place to find ARCs in ebook formats. They have an area for you to give information about yourself and your blog which publishers can see, as well as letting publishers see your request to review ratio. I like that it's much cheaper for publishers to use than sending out hard copies and they clearly set out their guidelines so you know the chances of being selected for a galley. Not all new releases are on there and you don't always get everything you request, but there have been a number of titles I requested and read that I never would have consider.

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  29. I'd heard of ARCs before I started blogging through all of the authors, librarians, and bloggers I was following on twitter. I actually got my first ARC through a Twitter contest, and didn't start blogging for a few months after that.
    Great post on ARCs and how they're not free!! :D

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    1. I had gotten a few ARCs from a bookstore in my area that gives them away, but other than that I had no idea what they were.

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  30. Like everyone else has said, amazing post :D I know this discussion topic has been gone over so many times, but some people still don't get it :/ I got lucky and happened to get my first ARC through a Goodreads giveaway.

    Personally, when I'm done with ARCs, I first pass them on to my sister (she's not a blogger, but she's still a reader, and hey, she's family!), then to my freshman literature teacher's classroom(: I also know of an organization in Seattle, where there donate books to airports, so waiting passengers can read books for free! I know that organization collects some old ARCs (I saw an ARC of Pandemonium there once - I was so psyched to read it!) and checks them out like a library system. It really is a great way for recycling ARCs since TONS of the passengers stop by and read them, therefore building excitement.

    Anyways, thanks for the post :D It's really informative and puts a lot of things into a realistic perspective.

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  31. nice post lady! spread the good word! haha

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  32. I love when bloggers talk about this topic because I know NOTHING about it. I didn't even know ARCs existed until I won one after starting my blog. Thank you so much, Anna.

    Oh, and I've noticed that sometimes (SOMETIMES) the finished copies are prettier, anyways. Hehe, a pretty book plus a good story are always wonderul, yes?

    Have a wonderful day!
    ♥Jessica(:

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  33. Thanks for this post - I've been wondering for a while what ARCs were and whether I'd be able to get hold of any, and this was really informative!

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According to FTC guidelines I must point out that all of the books that I review on my blog were either purchased by me or were given to me by the author/publisher. All words and opinions expressed are my own and I do not receive any monetary goods for writing reviews. I will state in my review which books I have received for review and which books I have purchased/borrowed. All images and synopsis are taken from Goodreads.com unless otherwise stated.
 
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